Running Alphabet Q&A #7: Sera Koo

Early this week I recieved a very special submission by Sera Koo who ran the capital O letter at the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, in the middle of Central Park, New York.

Here’s what she has to say:

What do you do for living?
I’m currently a grad student getting my masters in Interaction Design at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

How is running improving your creativity?
It helps me to look and exist outside of my small world. After awhile, as the runs get longer, you can’t help but take in the scenery, pick up on patterns, and be grateful for the simple things in life. Like… isn’t it amazing to run as the sun’s setting over the reservoir in Central Park? And running, for me, is less about the exercise as it is about a momentary respite where I can work out problems. There’s something about quietly slowing down that allows me to be at my creative best.

How was the experience of running a character?
Having yet another purpose to running was awesome and a nice change, especially something as collaborative as this. Running in NY can be difficult with all the taxis, stop lights and strollers everywhere. But this makes me want to experiment with paths and see what other characters I could help create.

Which is your favorite typeface?
I always keep coming back to League Gothic.

Thank you!

Running Alphabet Q&A #6: Mo Klaus

Maurice Klaus has recently run the uppercase N in Nivo, Michiga, USA.

What do you do for living?
I am an independent consultant. For the past 11 years, I have developed web-based process improvement training, simulations and software.

How is running improving your creativity?
Running gives me a great mental oasis to work on problems or questions – if I want to. Most of the time, I just run. Unless it is a very long run or race, I return refreshed and energized having shed all of the idle distractions that tend to accumulate in my mind between runs. This sets the stage for what is typically a longer period of post-run productivity and creativity. That is why I prefer a morning run. It prepares me well for the entire day.

How was the experience of running a character?
It was great fun! Part of the time I imagined I was at the tip of a giant red pen, slowing drawing my letter on my route. I wondered how much I could move to the left or right and have it register on the map. I didn’t realize how many slight turns were on my route even though I had run parts of it maybe 4000 times before.

Which is your favorite typeface?
Garamond when I’m feeling “seriffy” and Verdana when I’m not.

Thank you!

Running Alphabet Q&A #5: Eleah Lubatkin

Eleah Lubatkin has brought Running Alphabet to Brooklyn, creating a very fresh uppercase M.

What do you do for living?
By day, I work for First2Print a digital fabric printing studio – doing digital color correcting, WordPress design and blogging. By night, I moonlight as a copywriter/editor for Kaufmann Mercantile, a young company based out of Brooklyn, NY.

How is running improving your creativity?
Running helps me clear my mind and rid myself of negative energy/toxins.

How was the experience of running a character?
It was wonderful. The project and the shape of my letter pushed me to run farther than I might have otherwise. I love how a single concept was created, and it’s outcome is being sculpted and influenced by elements of chance – physical limitations of street layouts and human endurance. It creates a sort of global connection between runners and typeface nerds. :)

Which is your favorite typeface?
Century Gothic

Running Alphabet Q&A #4: Alexander Casassovici

Alexander Casassovici has recently run the uppercase K at Neuilly-sur-Seine, France.

What do you do for living?
I’m the co-founder of DiveBoard a place for scuba divers to log their dives, share their experiences and explore the world of scuba diving.

How is running improving your creativity?
A short run every other morning (5-8km) helps clear up the mind and pump up some energy for the end of the day… and often find out the creative solution that will solve (some) of the ongoing issues.

How was the experience of running a character?
Super fun! Although it’s quite tough to find a runnable pattern close enough to the letter I wanted to be drawing, it was really fun to run with a greater focus on the path I was following than on the usuals (animals and pace).

Which is your favorite typeface?
I guess it’s currently Monaco – not sure it’s really my favorite but definitely the one I’m using most!

Thank you!

Running Alphabet Q&A #3: E. Wayne Ross

E. Wayne Ross has recently run a very accurate uppercase H in Vancouver, Canada. Here comes his interview.

What do you do for living?
I’m a professor of education at the University of British Columbia, where I conduct research and teach courses related to curriculum and the politics of education.

How is running improving your creativity?
Running helps to clear my mind and allows me to focus on personal or professional projects. For example, my solo running time is often an opportunity to think about research and writing projects. Sometimes I finish a run with greater clarity about what it is I’m trying to accomplish; other times I’ll have “written” complete sections of articles in my head by the time I finish a run.

How was the experience of running a character?
I really enjoyed the idea of creating a piece of art/design via GPS mapping of a run. I was quite focused on running in a straight line, particularly in places where I had to double back on the route. There are a few places on the GPS map where you see that I had to run “off course” to get around pedestrians or other obstacles.

Which is your favorite typeface?
Verdana.

Thank you!

Running Alphabet Q&A #2: Ellen Schulte

Ellen Schulte was the first participant at Running Alphabet creating a 5,13 Km uppercase C at Columbus, Ohia, USA.

What do you do for living?
I’m an Assistant Web Designer at Express Headquarters.

How is running improving your creativity?
Running has always given me a break from my design work. It’s a time that allows me to take out all of my frustration and force my mind and body to relax so that I can come back to my design work and have a fresh mind.

How was the experience of running a character?
Running a character is a fun exercise that gets your brain thinking about all sorts of other things you can create while running. It definitely keeps my running routine fresh!

Which is your favorite typeface?
This is a tough question. I feel like with every project I find a new typeface to love. I think for right now my favorite San Serif is Century Gothic and my favorite Serif would be Adobe Garamond.

Running Alphabet Q&A #1: Conrado Miranda

Here comes the first of a series of interviews to all Running Alphabet participants. This time is Conrado Miranda turn, a runner from Ontario, Canada who has recently ran a 5,4 Km uppercase G.

What do you do for living?
IT Systems Management Consulting

How is running improving your creativity?
Preparing to run initially clears my mind and once I’m running, I’m able to think through solutions without distractions, except for the occasional car/traffic and dogs on the way.

How was the experience of running a character?
It was somewhat challenging to plan the character, mapping it out to find the best path/road to take and that I will be unable to jump over fences or go through someone’s backyard to generate a perfect letter. Running it, however, was fun and simply executing the plan and knowing that the activity would be a potential candidate for your project. A side benefit was that I ran through a part of my town that I have not ‘run’ until the day of the “G”.

Which is your favorite typeface?
I like Monaco and Calibri. I find these compact and easy to read.

© Copyright Running Alphabet - Project by Joan Pons Moll